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. and everybody in gaza will be committed because egypt is brokering this. the egyptians can do that. and they're the only ones who can do that, actually. >> what is your assessment of the u.s. role in all of this? do you believe the president, president obama, is doing enough to try to achieve a cease-fire? >> i'm sure he is. i'm sure he's engaged with the egyptians and the turks, with the europeans, engaged with us. but the key here is -- i think the egyptians -- i spoke to some of their officials this afternoon, they are exerting every possible effort there is in order to reach a comprehensive cease-fire. i think they can achieve it. provide the guarantees for all sides. >> is the palestinian authority -- what i'm hearing, i think the answer is yes. but you tell me. is the palestinian authority -- you're associated with the president, mahmoud abbas, on the same page right now with hamas in gaza? >> look, today, we are not the authority. we are all palestinians, wolf. it is our people. we know we want to reach peace. that's our ticket to security and peace. unfortunately, we have been unable
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
of israel and egypt and we are told secretary of state clinton has been working the phones trying to muster international pressure to diffuse the situation rockets have been flying both ways. that was an israeli missile strike right there in gaza. israel is aiming at terrorist targets and that's what it looks and sounds like from a distance. here it is up close during an interview with an israeli and palestinian who are in the thick of it. >> let me jump in there, mohammed. when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. that is one thing. carry on with your question. [ indiscernible ] >> the palestinian health minister says at least 30 people have been killed in gaza, 300 wounded. many of them children and women. he says we can't independently verify those numbers. cnn's sara sidener has seen the missiles up close and is reporting in very dangerous conditions. >> we have to leave this area now because there are air strikes, and we can hear the planes and we've also seen rockets coming from a neighborhood just from the other side. >> today egypt'
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
by egypt, turkey and qatari officials. israeli defense forces targeted a media building in gaza, aiming at four senior hamas operatives they believed were inside. and two people died. it is not clear if they were the ones designated as the hamas targets. hamas, which grew out of the muslim brotherhood, seized in our gaza in 2007. since then, the group has become increasingly militarized. the death toll stands at 100 in gaza including women and children. and three in israel. any others have been wounded on both sides. israel credits its anti-missional defense system known as the iron dome funded by the united states for its low number of deaths. cnn's frederick platkin was live when the system intercepted a rocket midair. >> there, over in the sky, you probably won't be able to see it here, there is an interceptor missile taking off now. that's the iron dome interceptor. if you saw the flash in the sky, that was a rocket coming out of gaudia that was just intercepted right now. >> despite back and forth rocket and missile launches, there is a behind the scenes optimism that a cease-fire
room" starts now. >>> happening now, police fire tear gas as demonstrations in egypt turn violent. angry protesters accuse egypt's president of betraying the revolution. and in the word of one critic, making himself a pharoah. what happened before and after u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s. did in the moments before killing osama bin laden. >>> wolf blitzer's off today. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's astonishing show of fury in egypt. within the past hour egyptian authorities tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
, to come before cameras in egypt and announce a period of calm. but that announcement has not happened. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so
're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." egypt on edge. thousands of furious protesters pack tahrir square after their new president makes a bold move for unprecedented power. so far, so good, that cease fire between israel and hamas is holding for now. but there are real fears even the slightest flare-up could kick off chaos. >>> how was i to know he would do a dumb thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us.
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
the 35-day deadline passes. and congress gets back to work this morning. plus a power grab in egypt. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of ke
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to pick up as the day goes on, but some of the things that are working in new york's favor, the weath
months as the war in syria has taken attention away, as the revolution in egypt, et cetera. this is a back-to-to the future situation where the issue that's been there all along, that hasn't received a lot of attention, but rockets have been going from gaza into israel many weeks and months now and a certain point was reached it was deemed intolerable. >> let's talk about the balance of power here, because egypt has, obviously, always been a player to some degree, much better relations with efwipts and have been able to expert pressure. we were discussing this earlier. we do not have that as much anymore given the fact that the new muslim brotherhood is basically in cahoots with hamas, the egyptian prime minister says egypt is standing by the people of gaza in their pain. that radically changes the u.s. calculus in the region or how much we can actually do. >> yeah. i don't think it changes our objectives but i think it changes what we can accomplish. the united states doesn't talk to hamas. so in the past, the way we've been able to promote potential cease-fires or agreeme
. >> maybe the position of egypt and today president mohammed morsi said this? >> translator: we are with them, what hurts us and the blood that flows from their children is our blood, too opinion. >> what did you make of that? >> we preferred to look at egyptian deeds rather than words. egypt has played a constructive role in the past in mediating cease-fires with gaza and we hope that the egyptians will continue to fulfill a constructive role in the future. >> you must have been disconcerted by the tone of president morsi's rhetoric there. >> again, we prefer to look at the egyptian deeds and they will play a constructive role in helping convince them to stop firing these thousands of rockets at our civilians. >> is your intention at the same time to continue targeting hamas leaders and to continue, if you can, killing them? >> well, we'll take any measures necessary to stop the aggression against the civilians and we're taking immense precautions not to hurt palestinian civilians. our planes have carried out hundreds of attacks and the number of palestinian civilians and have
, best buy, target, toys "r" us will match any online price. >>> the president of egypt is meeting members of the country's judiciary council to try to find a way out of a political crisis. violent street protests are continuing against president mohammed morsi's decision last week to grant himself sweeping new powers. now the justice minister says a resolution of the crisis is imminent butis not saying how. >>> in cairo, talks began between palestinians and israel. egypt is working with the two sides. they're negotiating a new border arrangements for the gaza strip. the palestinians want a complete lifting of a block aid while israel wants and ends to arms smuggling. >>> forensic experts arrived at tel aviv today, teams from switzerland, russia and france will take three samples of yassi yassir arafat's body to determine what killed him nearly eight years ago. >> we hope that all these experts will manage to basically finds what we're looking for, the truth. >> arafat's widow and many other palestinians believe he was poisoned. earlier this year a swiss lab found what it called si
to work with egypt, with turkey and ka trkqa try to convince the leadership to stop this very provocative and hardy shelling of rocketing the cities. when hamas is targeting both tel aviv and israel, this is a new phase of war between a long-running war between them. israel is going to react to that. i think you'll see a very intense demonstration between them to cease and decysist. >> gaza is not a big area. at some point they have to run out of pockets to some degree, don't they? >> yeah, but that's a big risk. so the big driver of the israeli operation right now is the long-range rockets that were allegedly supplied by iran and which hamas has been using to target major urban centers in israel like tel aviv, like jerusalem. tel aviv has been the red line for israel, and as long as hamas has been in possession of these rockets and can maintain that threat against israeli population centers, israel can't afford to sit back. so the air strikes, yes, they have been achieving some success, but hamas has still been lobbying those rockets over. we saw that today with strikes in jerusalem as w
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. appreciate it. [ sirens ] >>> new violence today in egypt. taking a look at this. protesters throwing rocks, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, se
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
morning. >>> then we will turn our focus to egypt. there are fears there of a new civil war in a country considered the number one arab ally of the u.s. we'll explain why that nation is again in such turmoil. >> protests. major protests planned for tuesday. >>> also this morning, family members call it a thanksgiving miracle. a young man who was the victim of a random act of violence, wakes up from a coma after a gunshot that could have killed him. >> never lose hope, i guess, is the moral of that story. wow. >>> and the frightening situation for superstar halle berry over the weekend that forced her to take legal action. we'll get the scoop later this half hour in "the skinny." we talked about the story at the end of last week. new developments over the weekend. it's pratt sad story, especially considering there's a little 4-year-old girl in the middle of that, but we'll get to that. >>> first, investigators say, far fewer workers might have died in the massive garment factory fire if there had been emergency exits. this morning there's word of a fire at a second factory in bangladesh.
at the u.n. and in egypt to finally reach a truce here. we asked abc's christiane amanpour in jerusalem, where diplomatic efforts now stands. >> reporter: the gang of nine are meeting the prime minister and senior advisers and cabinet to try to figure out how to respond to a proposal put forward by egypt. so the effort is really under way to have a diplomatic solution. whether it works or not we are waiting to see. all the american efforts are going through egypt, when it comes to hamas. they're taking the lead. from what we understand, egypt wants to have a cease-fire, then a bigger negotiation about lifting the siege of gaza. hamas wants that all to be part of one agreement. and israel wants to see a stop of hostilities, no more rockets into israel and doesn't want to link that to a cease-fire. so those are the parameters. how they get close together to make a success of this is really what's under way right now. >> thank you, christiane am afternoon pour, reporting from jerusalem. the "l.a. times" did a great story on this, summed up the heart of the conflict here. and it says -- any
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
, michael steele and jonathan capehart onset as well. rick stengel went to interview the president of egypt. obviously he's the man at the center of all the action in the middle east right now. we're all trying to figure out who he is. i learned something by reading "time" magazine. i found out he's a usc grad and still a trojans fan. little known fact. >> always start with the important parts of life. >> i'm sure he's very upset with what happened with the notre dame game. more importantly, who is this man who seems to be an accidental president who suddenly feels very comfortable with seizing power in the most important arab state in the planet? >> it's really interesting. this interview done by rick stengel and my colleagues is amazing because it sheds some light on this man who is really an ig enigma. he's walking var fine line between hard core islamists and others in the middle east. one of the most interesting things in the interview is how he feels about the u.s. that's been a big question mark for everyone here. what is this man's relationship to the u.s. what is our relationship w
became a symbol of the war in gaza when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead and i the child who was martyre. >> translator: the blood son both of our hands, ours and on the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, as a human, i am crying. i can't do anything for him because i know he's died now, you know. and you can't imagine if it's your baby how you feel. why? why? >> reporter: influx of casualties, men, women and children, is overwhelming this hospital underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. >>> that was sara sidner reporting. israeli civilians are also getting caught in the crossfire. our frederik pleitgen reports several rockets fired from gaza caused injuries in southern israel this morning. we'll take you live to that region next hour. >>> 400 bullets, two assault rifles and a ticket to "twilight." why police belie
built in. could that be qatar, turkey? the most likely player would be gypt. egypt. hamas. they have a relationship with israel, a strong relationship egypti with hamas. idea that might mean putting egyptian monitors in, on the idea that the long-range rockets hamas goted. from iran would be removed, no co further shipments would come in be no and there would be no shooting inte there. that would put egypt in a prettypresident mo interesting position. >> considering the new leader is the muslim brotherhood. >> they created hamas. monitor when you look at them as o monitor, that's the trust but trust. verify who do we really trust.egypt but israel has a long-standing s govern relationship with egypt, not this government. that would be a big test for vernment morsi, the morsi government and brother the muslim brotherhood as a broker legitimate broker in the region.nk and i think there's some hope that that could come together. also but also at the same time a lotlot of of discomfort.it. >> john, i'm struck by how much the egyptian president has been resident engaged with
. dagen: the u.s. embassy meantime in egypt now closed amid protests in the country against president mohammad morsi. voting has started on the new constitution. kc mcfarland, formerly distance secretary of defense and fox news national security analyst, great to see you. he is in the catbird seat because he inserted himself into the peace agreement between israel and hamas. >> he negotiated a cease-fire between israel and hamas, the words were not out of president obama's mouth praising him for this, offering to help him with half a billion dollars of aid, convincing the imf to give him almost $5 billion of aid and what did morsi do? e seized all the controls of power. already got the parliament and the presidency, put his guys in the military and taking over. connell: in the old days they used to say hosni mubarak was not the best guy in the world but the u.s. can work with him. what about now? >> that is an important difference to make because he was a dictator, hosni mubarak was that he was our guy, pro-american and kept peace with israel. the new guy is a dictator too but not nec
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
-5 on the road this year. >>> coming up in the "newsroom," protests escalating in egypt. people angry over the egyptian president mohamed morsi and what they call a power grab. we'll take you live to tahrir square. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. tintroducing a revolutionary. this it new mascara.r aleve. clump crusher...crusher. 200% more volume. zero clumps. new clump crusher from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and b
the situation all over the middle east has changed dramatically in the last year. egypt is no run by a dictator, it's run by the muslim brotherhood. should president obama put more pressure on the egyptian government, even threat tone cutoff aid to get hamas to stop firing those rockets? >> he needs to exert every kind of pressure he can to try to make sure it doesn't escalate into a full-blown war between the palestinians and the israelis. whatever that takes. the problem the israelis have is that these rockets are being fired on them from places they can't reach by flying over in the air. they are putting them in school yards where they are surrounded by school children and they are firing them from marketplace that is are crowded with people. israel has a right to protect its self. if sending ground troops in is the only way they can clean out these nests of rockets being fired at them, you know, you can't blame them for doing it. >> all right. let's turn to benghazi. both of you held closed-door hearings this week with top administration officials. and david petraeus reportedly said in thes
this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months before rebel fighters took down that regime and ousted and then killed gadhafi. sometimes governments have also blocked access to the internet in smaller, more directed ways like pakistan and bangladesh turning off youtube this year on account of that insane islamophobic video that sparked protests across the muslim world. just this week the government in tajikistan turned off facebook after people started posting mean things on facebook about the president of tajikistan who apparently is a wuss. pakistan, they blocked twitter for a day because of a, quote, blasphemous cartoon contest. this kind of thing happens. government shuts off parts of the interprnet or the whole dar thing. because this is a thing governments do to their people, preserving access to the internet and means of communication that the internet affords us, that has become a significant part of the way the u.s. interacts with other countries. it's become a s
next door in syria. you have a different government in egypt and the morrisey government is reacting differently than perhaps the mubarak government did before. >> what's the short-term solution then? >> well, i think the danger for israel for example, it has a right of self-defense, but obviously if it decides to return ground troops to gaza the optics there work against israel in a much -- in a region that now is governed far more by populism than by authoritarianism. i think it has to make sure that its response is aggressive, tries to deal with the threat to israel's people, but doesn't go too far. >> let's talk about the united states' potential role. health care was president obama's defining achievement for his first term. when we look at a second term will the president look at middle east peace, the road map to peace might this be his big deal for his second term? does it need to be? >> i think that's part of the motivation here. you know, you have coming up the palestinian authority which of course controls the west bank but not gaza is preparing to try to move toward enhan
will primarily from egypt. hamas is considered to be the muslim brotherhood of the palestinians and president morsi of egypt has been stepping in trying to assert. he withdrew his ambassador. not a huge move but trying to lend moral support. they're condemning the israeli actions calling for calm. now there's some talk about them canceling the camp david accords, revisiting that. forget that. at the end of the day, as much criticism as the egypts get from the americans and the israelis, they may end up being the ones to negotiate a broker's truce in this whole deal because they do hold sway with hamas. >> is it clear how long this is going on? israel will say -- >> absolutely, 50 years. >> well, and a very large umbrella kind of sense. but recently, you know, we are talking about israel saying they were bombarded in recent weeks. hamas says they're being bombarded in recent days. which is it? >> typical tit for tat. it has a life of its own and it could spread to a much wider region, much wider effects on the diplomatic and political events of the middle east that after all is in a very fragi
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